Why Modern 30-Year-Old Women Look Younger Than They Used To

In the past, a 30-year-old woman used to be considered an adult lady and she looked it! It was easy to tell a 20-year-old woman from a woman who was 10 years older. But today, a young girl can really shock us with her passport that says “30 years old” because today, 30-year-old girls look exactly the same as 20-year-olds. Why is that?

Scientists have proven that “middle age” begins at 35, so if you’re just 30 years old, you are officially a young person. We at smartzune.com  decided to find out more about the mysteries of age and want to understand why modern women look so different from the women of the past.

They understand age differently.

Mind time and clock time are two totally different things. They flow at varying rates.

The chronological passage of the hours, days, and years on clocks and calendars is a steady, measurable phenomenon. Yet our perception of time shifts constantly, depending on the activities we’re engaged in, our age, and even how much rest we get. An upcoming paper in the journal European Review by Duke University mechanical engineering professor Adrian Bejan, explains the physics behind changing senses of time and reveals why the years seem to fly by the older we get.  (The paper, sent to Quartz by its author, has been peer-reviewed, edited, and has been approved for publication but a date has not yet been set.)

Why Modern 30-Year-Old Women Look Younger Than They Used To

When today’s 30-year-old girls were growing up, they constantly heard that the age of a woman’s beauty ended at 30. It was the end of entertainment and happiness. But the stereotypes have changed and now we understand that 30 years old is a great age! We don’t worry about these numbers anymore and we feel young which has a positive effect on our appearance.Bejan is obsessed with flow and, basically, believes physics principles can explain everything. He has written extensively about how the principles of flow in physics dictate and explain the movement of abstract concepts, like economics. Last year, he won the Franklin Institute’s Benjamin Franklin Medal for “his pioneering interdisciplinary contributions…and for constructal theory, which predicts natural design and its evolution in engineering, scientific, and social systems.”