The Newest Democrat Bad Idea Could Put 57 Million Americans Out Of Work

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The PRO act which was passed by The House of Representatives last month, now has support from Joe Biden. This could endanger freelancers everywhere.

I am a freelancer, and this could put ME out of work.

If this happens, I will do as so many of my fellow freelancers do, and leave The United States.

I remember a time, 10 years ago when people were saying that freelancing is the future of work, and they’re right.

You get to pick your own hours, exactly which work you will do and not do, you can travel anywhere in the world, and claim tax deductions as business if you’re savvy enough.

I don’t WANT to be an employee, ever. I WANT and AM an independent contractor/microbusiness.

According to reports 57 million Americans rely on, or engage in this type of work.

This will only put MORE people out of work, and cause younger people to leave for greener pastures.

Here is the latest on the story:

Western Journal had more on the story:

Democrats want as many Americans out of work and dependent on the government as possible — and one of their newest legislative pushes makes that an indisputable fact.

Although President Joe Biden has been doing his best to depress the American economy by killing thousands of union jobs and furthering America’s plunge into generational debt, it’s all a pittance compared to what the Protecting the Right to Organize Act of 2021 could do if signed into law.

The PRO Act, passed by the House of Representatives last month and endorsed by Biden this week, could obliterate as many as 57 million jobs — that’s how many Americans freelanced in 2019, according to a survey released that year — by essentially outlawing freelance employment.

The Hill had more:

Among other things, the PRO Act would amend the National Labor Relations Act to redefine who is classified as an employee for the purposes of that law. The new definition would adopt the “ABC test” — a relic from the 1930s, and recently adopted by California, that imposes a strict three-part test to determine whether a worker is an employee or independent contractor. An individual must be classified as an employee unless:

“(A) the individual is free from control and direction in connection with the performance of the service, both under the contract for the performance of service and in fact; (B) the service is performed outside the usual course of the business of the employer; and (C) the individual is customarily engaged in an independently established trade, occupation, profession, or business of the same nature as that involved in the service performed.”

Critically, all three elements must be met for a worker to remain independent. Fail one prong, and you must be considered an employee. While the “A” and “C” parts of the test seek to prevent employers from deliberately misclassifying employees as contractors, the “B” part of the test is a poor fit for the modern era.


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