DOJ Expecting to Charge 100 More in Capitol Riot

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The riot at the U.S. Capitol Building occurred more than two months ago, but if you think that the Justice Department is close to winding up its investigations and charges against suspects, you’re wrong.

In fact, it sounds like the DoJ isn’t even close to being finished making an example of Trump supporters in ways that Antifa and BLM rioters have yet to be dealt with.

The department expects to charge at least 100 more people in connection with the riot, making the case one of the largest and most extensive in modern history.

Because of the scope of the investigation and the sheer number of cases being built, federal prosecutors are asking for an additional 60 days delay in riot-related cases.

“The investigation continues and the government expects that at least one hundred additional individuals will be charged,” prosecutors wrote a Friday court filing in Washington, D.C., citing a Justice Department probe. “While most of the cases have been brought against individual defendants, the government is also investigating conspiratorial activity that occurred prior to and on January 6, 2021.”

Fox News added:

More than 300 people have been arrested in connection with the attack. Attorneys described the effort as “likely the most complex investigation ever prosecuted” by the Justice Department.

Charges include trespassing, engaging in violent or disruptive behavior on Capitol grounds, destruction or theft of government property, assaults on federal and local law enforcement officers, firearms offenses, civil disorder, obstruction of an official proceeding, use of destructive devices and conspiracy.

More than 900 search warrants have been executed in nearly all 50 states, and evidence compiled to date includes more than 15,000 hours of surveillance or video footage, 1,600 electronic devices, 210,000 tips and 80,000 witness interviews.

“The failure to grant such a continuance in this proceeding would be likely to make a continuation of this proceeding impossible, or result in a miscarriage of justice,” U.S. District Judge Amit Mehta wrote in response to prosecutors’ request to put off proceedings for two months.

As the DoJ builds out its case in conjunction with the Capitol riot, it should be pointed out that despite constant attacks against a federal courthouse in Portland, Ore., last summer and fall — attacks that were renewed this week complete with an attempt to burn it down with people inside — no mass arrests of the Antifa and BLM anarchists involved in those attacks have been made.

In fact, the department, under then-Attorney General William Barr, ever really developed any cases against Antifa or BLM rioters. And earlier this month, a little-noticed report said that the DoJ was “quietly” dropping cases against Portland rioters, as KGW-8 noted:

Federal prosecutors have dismissed more than one-third of cases stemming from last summer’s violent protests in downtown Portland, when protesters clashed with federal agents. KGW reviewed federal court records and found 31 of the 90 protest cases have been dismissed by the U.S. Department of Justice, including a mix of misdemeanor and felony charges.

Some of the most serious charges dropped include four defendants charged with assaulting a federal officer, which is a felony. More than half of the dropped charges were “dismissed with prejudice,” which several former federal prosecutors described as extremely rare. “Dismissed with prejudice” means the case can’t be brought back to court.

So much for ‘equal justice under the law.’


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